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pork ribs on a plate

How to Smoke Ribs

  • Author: Sarah | AwayFromTheBox
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 4 hours
  • Total Time: 5 hours, 15 minutes
  • Yield: 1 full rack
  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Grill, Smoker
  • Cuisine: American

Description

The secret to awesome smoked ribs lies in the technique. Find out how to smoke ribs on a charcoal grill that are tender and so delicious!


Ingredients

1 full rack of pork spare ribs

vinegar or oil, for brushing

1/4 c. light brown sugar

2 tsp paprika

1/2 c. prepared bbq sauce

Tools:

spray bottle with water or vinegar

heavy duty aluminum foil

firewood or charcoal – about 20-30 briquettes + more as needed

small heat proof pan filled with water


Instructions

 To prepare the ribs

With the meat side down, trim off the fat from the rounded, fatty edge until the top of the rib bones are shown. This section usually starts around the 4th rib – you should be able to feel the ribs separate from the top rounded part (they’re held by cartilege). You can discard this or save it for stock or beans.

Flip the ribs over so that the bone side is down and feel along the edges of the meat. Cut off any stringy bits of fat or splintered bones so that you have a smooth edge all around. At this point you can flip it back to bone side up, make a shallow cut in the membrane and pull it off, or you can leave it on. I left mine on.

If you buy pre-trimmed (sometimes called St Louis style) ribs from the store, you may skip the trimming.

Applying the rub and cooking

Combine the brown sugar and paprika in a small bowl. Grab about half of the spice rub (use gloves for this if you can) and generously coat the ribs. Flip them and repeat for the other side.

Set about 20-30 charcoal briquettes in a tall pile on the grill, near the grate. Keep the grate open slightly, and open more or less throughout cooking in order to keep the grill at a steady 250-275°F. Light about 10 briquettes in a starter or on the other side of the grill, then add to your existing pile. You can add charcoal as the others die down during cooking, but don’t light them. They will ignite naturally from the existing charcoal.

Place the ribs on the grill meat side up. Fill a small metal pan (about 4-6 inches deep) with water and place it on the grill next to the ribs, between them and the coals. Close the lid and cook.

After about 2 hours, open the grill and check the color – make sure it has stayed at a steady 275°F (add more coals as necessary). Spray the ribs with water or vinegar. It will remove the smoke so you can see the color more accurately. You want a deep reddish brown. If it appears splotchy, keep cooking and check every 30 minutes (spraying each time) to check until the ribs are an even deep red-brown all over.

Baste the ribs with a thin layer of bbq sauce and cook for 15 minutes. Flip them, baste the other side and cook again for another 15 minutes.

Grab heavy duty aluminum foil that is long enough to fully cover the ribs, then dilute about 2 TB of bbq sauce with some water so that it is rather runny. This will keep the sauce from clumping and burning your ribs. Spray the foil with your water or vinegar, then spread the thinned bbq sauce over it in the shape of your ribs. Place the ribs in the sauce meat side down, then lightly spray and sauce the top before closing up the foil.

Continue cooking at 275°F for another 2 hours. You can do this on the grill or in a preheated oven, as it wont absorb more smoke after it is wrapped.

To determine if the ribs are done, gently hold the full rack in your hands (use pot holders or gloves – it will be hot). If the rack bends very easily, it might be overdone. If it is stiff, it needs more time. You can also try pulling the bones away from the meat in the center of the rack. They should require a slight pull, but will still slide out of the meat easily.

Let the ribs rest at room temperature for 20-30 minutes before slicing and serving.


Notes

Scale up this recipe as much as you’d like. You can make one or several racks of ribs at a time!